South Coast tour to Glendalough & Powerscourt

10% Discount When You Book Online

 

 

The Glendalough & Powerscourt tour is one of Ireland's best day's out.

 

Take the tour and find out why!

 

  • Visit the lakes and medieval city at Glendalough
  • Roam the elegant Georgian gardens at Powerscourt
  • Enjoy lunch or tea and scones at the Avoca Cafe
  • See the stunning scenery of Wicklow and the Wicklow mountains
  • 2 Children go Free with each paying adult

 

Experience two of Ireland's most beautiful destinations, situated right on Dublin’s doorstep on a perfect day tour to Wicklow. You'll visit Powerscourt Estate and Gardens, voted No.3 in National Geographic's Top 10 Gardens of the World, and historic Glendalough, home to Ireland's oldest monastic city.

 

Glendalough

 

Departing from Dublin City Centre, the tour takes in the beautifully developed Docklands area of Dublin City, before travelling along the great sweep of Dublin Bay, passing by Beach Road at Sandymount. The tour then travels inland, climbing the beautiful Wicklow Mountains, and continues to the enchanting old world village of Enniskerry, home to Powerscourt Estate and Gardens.

 

Passengers on the tour can then explore the highlights of Glendalough with a visit to this monastic settlement, which was founded by St. Kevin in the 6th century. Glendalough is an area steeped in both natural beauty and historical significance.

On returning to Dublin, the tour will pass through even more spectacular landscapes and the ever changing scenery of the Wicklow and Dublin Mountains.

 

*2 Kids under 14 go free with each paying adult. Offer does not apply to group or discount bookings.

 

Glendalough & Powerscourt Gardens Tour

 

Departs from Dublin Bus Head Office, 59 Upper O'Connell Street. Tours Depart at 10:30 and return at 17:00.

 

Vouchers for tickets purchased online must be printed out and cannot be accepted on phones.

Tour Information

Adult €24.30
Children €10.80
Price includes online Discount.

Route Map

Glendalough Powerscourt Tour Map, dublin bay

Tour Highlights

Dun Laoghaire

Dun Laoghaire

Perhaps Ireland's oldest town, Dún Laoghaire is named after its founder, the High King of Ireland who used the area as his sea-fort for raiding into Britain and France. The harbour is notable for it's two granite piers. The East Pier is particularly popular with walkers, while the West Pier is heavily used year-round by windsurfers. Other features of the town include the National Maritime Museum of Ireland and a Martello Tower in nearby Sandycove, known as the James Joyce Tower. The famous Peoples Park Farmers Market is also there every Sunday.


Sandycove

Sandycove

Sandycove is a pleasant little harbour where the James Joyce Museum can be found in the Martello Tower built in 1804. This tower was lived in briefly by James Joyce and became famous as the setting for the opening of Ulysses. The museum was opened in 1962, featuring memorabilia, letters, first editions of Joyce's works and other Joycean memorabilia.


Enniskerry

Enniskerry

The picturesque village of Enniskerry is located east of The Wicklow Way. The heart of the village retains its elegant Victorian feeling with its most distinctive feature is the clock tower dating from 1843. It was erected as a memorial to the Wingfield family then owners of the nearby Powerscourt Estate.


Powerscourt

Powerscourt

Powerscourt House and Gardens are probably the finest in Ireland, both for their design and their dramatic setting at the foot of Great Sugar Loaf Mountain. Richard Wingfield, the first Viscount Powerscourt, commissioned the house and grounds in the 1730's. It now incorporates a range of specialty shops as well as a restaurant, golf course and formal gardens.


Glendalough

Glendalough

Glendalough, known as the “Valley of the Two Lakes” is an area as rich in spectacular scenery as it is in historical significance. Glendalough is home to one of the most important monastic sites in Ireland. It is here that St. Kevin founded a monastery in the 6th century. Most of the buildings that survive today date from the 10th through 12th centuries. Despite attacks by Vikings over the years, Glendalough thrived as one of Ireland’s great ecclesiastical foundations and schools of learning until the Normans destroyed the monastery in 1214 A.D. and the dioceses of Glendalough and Dublin were united.